Grandmaster Decision Making with GM Alex Lenderman

$19.99

Description

Grandmaster Decision Making with GM Alex Lenderman

Grandmaster Decision Making with GM Alex Lenderman

How many times have you found yourself in a situation when you think your opponent has made a mistake?

You look at the move and think “it must be a blunder.” You even know how to take advantage of it. Often, things are not as simple as they seem at first glance.

In fact, some of those “mistakes” are not mistakes at all, but tricky moves. If you don’t understand the position well enough you may buy into it, ruining your game.

What should you do about it?

Make good decisions – win more games!

By incorrectly interpreting your opponent’s move as a mistake you will make a mistake yourself the very next move!

In the first part of this video course, top American Grandmaster Alex Lenderman teaches you not to assume that your opponent’s move is a mistake, until absolutely sure. GM Lenderman provides many illustrative examples demonstrating this important concept.

He shares his own personal thinking methods which help him to precisely identify dangerous moments in a game and resolve them in his favor.

About the Author:

Grandmaster Decision Making with GM Alex Lenderman

Aleksandr Lenderman is an American chess grandmaster. As of 2019, he was ranked #12 in the United States with an Elo of 2615.

He won the 2005 World Under-16 Championship in Belfort with a score of 9/10 (+8 −0 =2), becoming the first American to win a gold medal at the World Youth Chess Championship since Tal Shaked won the World Junior Championship in 1997.

Lenderman played for the USA team in the 2015 World Team Chess Championship in Tsaghkadzor, Armenia, and scored 5/7, winning the gold medal on the second board.

He won the 2015 World Open after beating Rauf Mamedov in an Armageddon playoff; the two had the best tiebreak among eight players who tied for first place with 7/9.

How is this course going to help me?

Grandmaster Decision Making with GM Alex LendermanThe second very important concept in chess is the complete opposite of the first one.  Even if your opponent is a significantly stronger player, it by no means implies his play is flawless.

You shouldn’t be intimidated by your opponent’s credentials and expect perfection. Many players underperform simply because they overestimate their opponent’s strength.

Yes, he may be a higher rated player, but it should not psychologically impact your game.  In the second part of this video course, GM Lenderman teaches you how to approach stronger opponents and maximize your chances for success. In fact, in many cases the pressure will be on your opponent who won’t want to lose to a ‘lower-rated’ opponent!

This is a must-have material for all under-2200 Elo rated chess players.

What you will learn?

  • Critical aspects of chess psychology that will help you get an edge over your competition
  • Grandmaster techniques for finding and exploiting your opponent’s mistakes and weaknesses
  • Step-by-step grandmaster decision-making algorithm that will help you even in the toughest positions
  • Rules that you always need to follow when making decisions in your games
  • The thinking process that GM Lenderman uses in every single game with great success (and you can too!)
  • Powerful ideas that will help you face higher rated players
  • and much more!

By simply following GM Alex Lenderman’s guidelines and applying his advice in your games you will significantly increase your playing capacity!

Additional information

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Running Time

+2 Hours

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1 review for Grandmaster Decision Making with GM Alex Lenderman

  1. Rated 4 out of 5

    Brian Coombs (verified owner)

    This lecture focuses on your state of mind as you play chess rather than giving a critical analysis
    of openings etc. I was surprised that someone rated over 2500 faces the same issues as I do – being overawed by higher rated opponents or at times making rash moves. I found it helpful as he went through the games explaining it is more important to worry about what is on the board rather than who is facing you.

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