Magnus Carlsen’s Trademark: A Seven Hour Win Against Sergey Karjakin

Magnus Carlsen’s Trademark: A Seven Hour Win Against Sergey Karjakin

Magnus Carlsen’s Trademark: A Seven Hour Win Against Sergey KarjakinHikaru Nakamura once again showed that he belongs to the absolute elite at shorter time controls by winning the Saint Louis Rapid and Blitz ahead of Maxime Vachier-Lagrave and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov.

This win also secured Hikaru a comfortable lead (33 points) in the overall standings of the Grand Chess Tour 2018 ahead of MVL (25 points) and Karjakin (24 points).

The players only got a short break, however, as the Sinquefield Cup 2018 – the last leg of the 2018 Grand Chess Tour – started on Saturday.

The first 3 rounds saw 4 decisive results. Sergey Karjakin lost his first two games against Aronian and Carlsen. Mamedyarov beat Wesley So and Grischuk managed to beat Nakamura with Black. All the other games ended peacefully.

The one game that really stood out was Magnus Carlsen vs Sergey Karjakin in round 2.

Magnus is known for his excellent physical stamina as well as the ability to relentlessly pressure his opponents in seemingly calm positions, finally squeezing out a win. His games against Sergey Karjakin, lasting 88 moves and almost 7 hours, highlighted these attributes once again. Magnus Carlsen’s Trademark: A Seven Hour Win Against Sergey KarjakinIt’s a brilliant example of what a difference physical fitness can make in long, exhausting games.

Magnus Carlsen pressed for a long time in an equal endgame and before squeezing a win out of seemingly nothing. After the game,  Sam Shankland commented on Facebook:

“I’ve seen a lot of great Carlsen games in my life, but today’s may well have been my favorite ever. There is no substitute in chess for sheer willpower.”

Carlsen, Magnus (2842) – Karjakin, Sergey (2773), Saint Louis 2018

We join the game after Black’s 24th move. The position is very close to equal. White has the better pawn structure, but with opposite-colored bishops, it’s not easy to successfully attack Black’s weak pawn on d5.

Still, Magnus Carlsen shows that to win in chess you need a mixture of  patience and pressure. 64 moves later, Karjakin resigned. Let’s see what happened:

Exclusive Webinar With Anatoly Karpov

You might have missed this Saturday’s webinar with former World Chess Champion Anatoly Karpov. If so, no worries! We recorded the live stream for you, so you can watch it any time this week.

In the webinar, Anatoly Karpov looks forward to the World Chess Championship match between current champ Magnus Carlsen, and his challenger, Fabiano Caruana. Together with his long-time friend Grandmaster Ron Henley, Karpov examines games from both players and looks at how their playing styles contrast, giving us a fascinating insight into November’s match.

On top of the analysis, Karpov  answers a ton of questions from the  live viewers. What are Karpov’s favorite openings? How has chess changed since he retired? Which chess concepts are the most difficult to learn? If you ever wanted to hear Anatoly Karpov’s opinion on these and many more questions, you definitely need to watch this!

Blog Article of The Week

Magnus Carlsen’s Trademark: A Seven Hour Win Against Sergey Karjakin
Click here to read all you need to know about Fabiana Caruana’s chess career in a nutshell.

This week’s featured blog article chronicles the amazing chess career of Magnus Carlsen’s challenger for the World Chess Championship this fall – Fabiano Caruana. The 26 year old is the first American chess player to challenge for the title since Bobby Fischer.

We took a closer look at the current World No. 2.

  • How did Caruana become a grandmaster?
  • What have been his greatest successes so far?
  • How has his playing style changed over time? What are  his chances against the World Champion?

Check out: Is Fabiano Caruana the Next Bobby Fischer?

Last week’s puzzle:

Did you find the winning sequence from last week’s chess puzzle?

This week’s puzzle:

Magnus Carlsen’s Trademark: A Seven Hour Win Against Sergey KarjakinWhite to move and win.

Answer next week.

3 comments on “Magnus Carlsen’s Trademark: A Seven Hour Win Against Sergey Karjakin

  1. gordon says:

    Rd8+,Kg7 h6+,Kf6 Rd6+,Qxd6 Bg5+, Ke5 Bf4

  2. Arjan says:

    7.Bg5 mate

  3. sgo says:

    1.Rd8 Kg7 2.h6 Kf6 3.Rd6 Qxd6 4.Bg5 Ke5 5.Bf4 Kxe4 6.Bxd6 1-0

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3 comments on “Magnus Carlsen’s Trademark: A Seven Hour Win Against Sergey Karjakin

  1. gordon says:

    Rd8+,Kg7 h6+,Kf6 Rd6+,Qxd6 Bg5+, Ke5 Bf4

  2. Arjan says:

    7.Bg5 mate

  3. sgo says:

    1.Rd8 Kg7 2.h6 Kf6 3.Rd6 Qxd6 4.Bg5 Ke5 5.Bf4 Kxe4 6.Bxd6 1-0

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