The King’s Indian Attack against The Caro-Kann Defense

You’re looking for a universal opening system with White which saves you a lot of time to learn theoretical lines and can be used against various of Black’s setups? Then it might be interesting for you to play the King’s Indian Attack. The good news is that GM Damian Lemos is a competent expert in this opening.

He already examined structures against openings like the Sicilian, the French or the Pirc Defense. In this video, he analyses a hugely instructive game in the King’s Indian Attack featuring a strong setup for White against the Caro-Kann.

The King’s Indian Attack against The Caro-Kann Defense

Baku 2016: Amin, Bassem (2661) – Naghdiyev, Niyazi, Siyavush (2366) 

One advantage of playing the King’s Indian Attack is that you know where your pieces belong, you are familiar with typical plans and you quickly develop a strong intuition of the subtleties in this opening.

The game we are looking at started with the moves 1.e4 c6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 e5 4.Ngf3 Bd6 5.g3 Nf6 6.Bg2 0-0 7.0-0.

The King’s Indian Attack Against The Caro-kann Defense

Black has a choice here. One idea is to close the center with the move 7…d4. This, however, allows White to use typical King’s Indian plans with colors reversed.

He can put his knight on c4, back it up with the move a2-a4 and pressure the Black pawn on e5. Moreover, as soon as the center is closed, it’s always an idea to play on the flanks.

In this type of positions, it’s a common plan for White to play Nf3-h4 and seize space on the kingside with the move f2-f4.

In the game, Black decided to go for 7…Bg4 8.h3 Bh5 9.Qe1. This is another typical move in the King’s Indian Attack, removing the queen from the pin and avoiding possible trades on the d-file.

After 9…Re8 Nh4 (with the idea of bringing the knight to the strong outpost on f5) Black decided to clear the situation in the center and played 10…dxe4 11.dxe4.

In the video, GM Damian Lemos shows you how the game developed and which plans White used in the middlegame to put a lot of pressure on the Black position. Finally, the following position was reached after Black’s 28th move:

The King’s Indian Attack Against The Caro-kann Defense

White completely outplayed Black by simply making natural moves. White is far more active in the position and Black’s pieces seem to be paralyzed.

White realized his chance to seal the deal and finished off the game with 29. Nxc7 Qxc7 30.Qf7 (threatening Rxd7) Re7 31.Qd5 Nb8 (Black lacks any active moves).

Now White played 32.Bc4 and brought the last piece into play (note that White strongly prepared the activation of his worst pieces in the position by playing Bg2-f1 before he started any concrete action).

Black defended with 32…Rg7 as White was threatening mate on g8. But Bassem Amin followed up with 33.Bh6 and Black finally resigned in a hopeless position. It is great to see that all of White’s pieces actively take part in the game whilst Black’s pieces are all damned to passivity.

If you’d like to watch the whole game and listen to the detailed explanations by GM Damian Lemos, you should definitely watch the whole video!

Do you want to learn more about this flexible opening system for White? Click here to get a special discount on Easy Way to Learn The King’s Indian Attack by GM Roman Dzindzichashvili (2550).

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