[TOP 7] Bobby Fischer’s Chess Games

Bobby Fischer’s Chess Games – Top 7

Former World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer is one of the greatest legends in the history of chess. He was a fantastic chess player from whom we can learn plenty of key concepts today.

For this reason, GM Eugene Perelshteyn picked some of Bobby Fischer’s chess games and takes us through them in the free video. These games are not only some of the most amazing games Fischer played throughout his career but also each of these games contains a beautiful opening trap.Bobby Fischer's Chess Games - Top 7

New York 1958: Fischer, Bobby Fischer – Reshevsky, Samuel 

This is a well-known game which you can find in many chess books on opening traps. There are a strong rivalry between Bobby Fischer and Samuel Reshevsky, one of the strongest American Grandmasters at that time. Ahead of the Buenos Aires 1960 tournament, for example, Reshevsky reportedly said: “I would settle for 19th place – if Fischer placed 20th.”

In this game, Fischer knocks out his opponent right in the opening.

The game started 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 g6 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6 (see the diagram on the right).

Reshevsky plays an opening which enjoys a huge popularity today – the Accelerated Dragon.

In contrast to the “normal” Sicilian Defense Dragon Variation, Black avoids playing d7–d6, so that he can later play d7–d5 in one move, if possible. The great thing about the Accelerated Dragon is that Black avoids the Yugoslav Attack – one of the sharpest opening systems in the Sicilian. Bobby Fischer's Chess Games - Top 7

7. Bc4 – Consequently, Fischer prophylactically overprotects the d5-square. The attempt to go for the Yugoslav Attack with 7.f3 0-0 8.Qd2 could be met by the thematic 8…d5! and Black has a nice position. 7…O-O 8.Bb3 – Fischer maneuvers his bishop to b3 where it is protected and controls the important a2-g8 diagonal. Bobby Fischer's Chess Games - Top 7

8…Na5? (see the diagram on the left) – a logical move, attacking the bishop on b3. However, this turns out to be a decisive mistake. Fischer finds a beautiful combination here.

9.e5. Fischer drives Black’s knight away from f6. Black can’t take on b3 now. 9…Nxb3 10.exf6! Nxa1 11.fxg7 Kxg7 12.Qd2! (threatening Bh6) Kg8 13.Bh6 Re8 14.0-0 and the knight is trapped on a1 (see the diagram on the right).

9…Ne8 10.Bxf7! (see the diagram on the left) – a beautiful sacrifice. Black has to take back with the king as 10…Rxf7 is simply met by 11.Ne6!! and suddenly Black loses his queen. The knight on e6 can’t be captured due to the pin along the d-file.Bobby Fischer's Chess Games - Top 7

10…Kxf7 11.Ne6!! – Fischer plays Ne6 anyway. In the game, Reshevsky took the knight with 11…dxe6, but simply had a losing position after 12.Qxd8. Fischer won the the game convincingly after 42 moves.

However, what happens if Black accepts the challenge and takes the knight with his king? – 11…Kxe6Bobby Fischer's Chess Games - Top 7

The point is that Black’s king will be mated quickly. 12.Qd5+ – a logical follow-up, driving the king further into the danger zone. 12…Kf5 13.g4+! – White continues checking. 13…Kxg4 14.Rg1+ (see the diagram on the right).

Black’s position is hopeless. 14…Kh3 runs into 15.Qg2+ Kh4 16.Qg4 mate and 14…Kh5 loses to 15.Qd1+ Kh4 16.Qg4 mate.

 

Bobby Fischer’s Chess Games – Conclusion 

Click here and get a special discount on "Destroy White with the Accelerated Dragon"
Click here and get a special discount on “Destroy White with the Accelerated Dragon”

A fantastic game opening trap by Bobby Fischer. If you want to see more of Bobby Fischer’s chess games, you should definitely watch the whole video. GM Perelshteyn shows you six more great games in the video.

Do you want to know how to play the Accelerated Dragon, which actually is a very decent opening for Black against 1.e4, correctly? Click here and get a special discount on “Destroy White with the Accelerated Dragon” by GM Eugene Perelshteyn.

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