Live Stream: Anatoly Karpov on Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana [Noon EST, Sat 18th Aug]

Join the legendary Anatoly Karpov for an exclusive live stream with iChess!

Karpov hardly needs an introduction. Official World Chess Champion from 1975 to 1985, and again from 1993 to 1999, his decades at the very top of chess cements Anatoly as one of the greatest players of all time, without doubt.

And Anatoly Karpov is in the iChess studio, recording his very own Master Method course! Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on social media to get the latest news and updates as the course gets developed and brought to release very soon.

Karpov is joined by his long-time friend Grandmaster Ron Henley. Aside from being a strong player in his own right, Ron acted as second, analyst and trainer for Karpov in many of his matches in the 1990s. Ron also trained 7-time US Women’s Chess Champion, GM Irina Krush.

Karpov, like most of us, is looking forward to the World Chess Championship match later this year between current champ Magnus Carlsen, and the challenger, Fabiano Caruana. In this stream, Karpov looks at games from both players and analyzes how their play styles contrast from each other, giving us an interesting preview of what we can look forward to in November.

Apart from that, Karpov also answers plenty of questions from the viewers. What are Karpov’s favorite openings? How has chess changed since he retired? Which chess concepts are the most difficult to learn? If you ever wanted to hear Anatoly Karpov’s opinion on these and many more questions, it’s time to dive into the mind of the former World Champion.

Anatoly Karpov on Carlsen vs Caruana – Who Will Win?

According to Anatoly Karpov, the World Chess Championship 2018 will definitely be a close struggle between Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana. Both players have great chances and we’ll surely see many entertaining games along the way.

In the webinar, Anatoly Karpov highlights that both players excel when playing equal positions. They even manage to create difficulties for their opponents in apparently simple positions. By cleverly maneuvering the pieces, they often find ways to put unpleasant pressure on their rivals. To illustrate this, Karpov takes a closer look at two examples:

Caruana, Fabiano (2789) – Ponomariov, Ruslan (2723), Dortmund 2014

It’s well-known that Magnus Carlsen squeezes wins out of microscopic advantages. Karpov shows us that Fabiano Caruana is capable of doing the same.

Karjakin, Sergey (2767) – Carlsen, Magnus (2868), Stavanger 2013

Anatoly Karpov chooses a second illustrative example to show that Magnus, of course, knows how to outplay his rivals in equal or dynamically balanced positions, too.

These two brilliant combinational games by Carlsen and Caruana can be seen as a teaser to what awaits us this fall. Karpov predicts that we’re going to see an interesting match.

Q&A with Anatoly Karpov

Which chess concept is most difficult to learn?

Live Stream: Anatoly Karpov On Magnus Carlsen Vs Fabiano Caruana [noon Est, Sat 18th Aug]Anatoly Karpov points out that many chess players have difficulties finding the right balance between studying and practice. To become a better player, it’s key to play a lot of games against strong opposition.

However, playing these games is not enough. It’s of paramount importance to deeply analyze your own games afterward. Detecting your mistakes is the first step to not repeating them. A good mix of study and practice helps you to quickly overcome your current level.

Moreover, the ability to defend in bad positions is a tough skill to learn. According to Karpov, Viktor Korschnoi, for example, became an outstanding player because he was able to put up as much resistance as possible when he found himself in a worse position. Many chess players lack this skill and collapse far too quickly in bad positions.

How has chess changed since you retired?

First of all, Karpov explains that he did not retire completely as he still plays international tournaments from time to time. However, he stopped playing classical chess as he is lacking time to play.

That said, Karpov mentions that computers do have a huge impact on chess nowadays. The reason why chess players appear younger and younger is that it is much easier to collect information today. When Karpov was still dominating the chess world, players collected information and experience over the course of years. Today, excellent chess training sources are available to everyone – no matter where in the world you live or how old you are.

Karpov also thinks that players of his generation were better at playing endgames. The reason for this is that adjourned games forced the players to analyze endgame positions deeply and extensively at that time. Today, most chess players analyze their endgames only superficially with the help of an engine. They don’t devote their time to deeply analyzing endgames on their own.

Deep Into The Mind Of A Chess Legend

In the webinar, Anatoly Karpov answers a lot more questions on various topics. Be sure not to miss this unique chance to hear what he has to say – watch the whole training session with one of the world’s greatest chess legends.

If you can’t wait until Karpov’s brand-new chess course will be released, you can sign up to our free email course now. You’ll not only be informed when Anatoly Karpov’s Master Method will be available but also get to know GM Damian Lemos’ top tips for rapid chess improvement. Click here to sign up for the chess masterclass today!

2 comments on “Live Stream: Anatoly Karpov on Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana [Noon EST, Sat 18th Aug]

  1. ayush gupta says:

    it isa great news ichdsnt had produced this year one of hte greatest chess course of all thet ime sir you are the bedst best best

  2. Greg says:

    I’m excited to see Karpov’s Master Method course

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2 comments on “Live Stream: Anatoly Karpov on Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana [Noon EST, Sat 18th Aug]

  1. ayush gupta says:

    it isa great news ichdsnt had produced this year one of hte greatest chess course of all thet ime sir you are the bedst best best

  2. Greg says:

    I’m excited to see Karpov’s Master Method course

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