How To Checkmate- Chess for Absolute Beginners – GM Damian Lemos

If you’re a complete beginner at chess, it might seem very simple at first – but once you go deeper and deeper you may start to feel overwhelmed with all the knowledge and concepts you need to learn and master.

The point of the game is to checkmate your opponent. Easy, right? Well, how exactly do we checkmate our opponent? How do we coordinate our pieces to work together in order to deliver that final winning blow?

In this video, GM Damian Lemos covers some of the basic checkmate patterns you need to know in order to start being successful at chess. You’ll learn how to control the board, cut off the king and set-up a mating net.

This video is an exclusive preview of GM Damian Lemos new Absolute Beginners Chess Course. The 7-hour course is a comprehensive chess foundational program for unrated beginners to around 1500 Elo.

It’s full of practical information and evergreen principles that are certain to improve your game and help you shed that ‘beginner’ tag.

If you want to really understand chess concepts and start outplaying your opponents easily, this course is for you.

In this chapter, you’ll learn how to checkmate with a King and two rooks vs King, King and Rook vs King, King and Queen vs King, and King and two bishops vs King – endgames you’ll likely find yourself in regularly.

There’s no point being a queen to the good, or with two more rooks than your opponent if you don’t know how to convert that advantage into a win!

You’ll also see how to avoid stalemate – a position where your opponent has no legal moves remaining. Such a situation is a drawn game – something you want to be careful not to fall into! You want the full point for a win.

Chess for Beginners: King and 2 Rooks vs King

How To Checkmate- Chess For Absolute Beginners – Gm Damian LemosLet’s take a look at the first checkmate that GM Damian Lemos explains. How do you checkmate with a king and two rooks, against a lone king?

See the diagram on the left. This is one of the easiest checkmates in the game of chess and is simple to learn. Just bear in mind the principle of “cutting off the king.”

You want to reduce the space that the opponent king can move into.

How To Checkmate- Chess For Absolute Beginners – Gm Damian Lemos

This can be done with the move Ra7.

See, on the right, how the rook acts like a barrier the king can not cross. The king is restricted to the single rank.

No matter where the king moves, White wins on the next move with Rh8, checkmate!

This principle of cutting the king off is very useful, and you can do it on any side of the board. Look at the same example, and there is no difference as to which rook moves first.

You could play Rh7 first, and then mate with Ra8 next.

Let’s move the enemy king to e3. Now what? Well, keeping in mind the idea of cutting off the king, we can see that Rh3+ works like a charm.

How To Checkmate- Chess For Absolute Beginners – Gm Damian LemosAfter the king moves back, the other rook comes in, and they repeat this overlapping pattern like an escalator, forcing the king to the side of the board and into checkmate. See the image on the left.

There’s also another way to checkmate the king in this position. Can you find it?

You could play Rh4 first, cutting off any retreat from the king. After something like Kd3, you can play Ra3+, Kc2, Rh2+, Kc1 and finally Ra1#.

The best move for Black after Rh2+ is Kb1, making Ra1 impossible. See the diagram below. Can you spot the winning combination for White?

See if you can solve the puzzle, and then watch the video with GM Damian Lemos for the solution, as well as his explanations of a few other types of checkmate.

How To Checkmate- Chess For Absolute Beginners – Gm Damian Lemos

Chess For Absolute Beginners

How To Checkmate- Chess For Absolute Beginners – Gm Damian Lemos
Absolute Beginners Chess Course

If you’re a complete beginner at chess, it might seem very simple at first – but once you go deeper and deeper you may start to feel overwhelmed with all the knowledge and concepts you need to learn and master.

Feeling dizzy studying vast chess opening theory, and still faltering within the first 10 moves?

Are you getting confused when trying to calculate seemingly endless lines in complex middlegames, only to end up in time trouble?

Missing tactical chances even in winning positions and having to settle for a mere half point?

There’s no need to panic or give up. All chess players were beginners at some point, including Grandmaster Damian Lemos. In his new course, Damian explains all the basic concepts you need to know in order to shed your ‘beginner’ tag and start winning games! Click here for instant access with 50% off.

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